Speakers/Workshop Leaders

2019 speakers 

Keynote: Dylan Hedden-Nicely

Associate Professor of Law, Director, Native American Law Program

University of Idaho

 

Professor Hedden-Nicely teaches a variety of courses, including Native American law, Native American natural resources law, tribal nation economics & law, and civil procedure.  His research interests include Native American natural resources and water law, tribal treaty rights, tribal civil and regulatory jurisdiction, water rights law, the interrelationship of law and science with applications to natural resources law, tribal economic development and tribal governance, as well the under-representation of Native people in the legal profession.   

Dagny Deutchman

Conservation Fellow

Idaho conservation League

 

Dagny Deutchman is a 4th generation Idahoan who grew up in Salmon, Idaho. She spent all winter working for the Idaho Conservation League increasing awareness about Idaho's endangered salmon and steelhead populations and connecting outdoor professionals to conservation efforts. She is currently a guide liaison for the Redside Foundation and sits on the board of directors for the Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association as she believes in bolstering Idaho guides in any way that she can. This will be Dagny's 11th year guiding in the Frank Church Wilderness before she heads off to pursue a Ph.D. in research psychology at Montana State University. Dagny can frequently be found running around in a Batman onesie, forcing her friends to read her mediocre poetry, and starting most sentences with "recent psychology research suggests...". She loves tango, cheese, and a great true story.

Bre Anderson

STEAM and Environmental Educator

AmeriCorps, U of I Extension, Palouse Clearwater Environmental Institute

 

Bre is currently an AmeriCorps member focused on bringing environmental education to the community of Valley County.  As a recent master’s graduate of the University of Idaho McCall Outdoor Science School she strives to connect people with a place through exploration and ecological education. Last summer was her first summer as a river guide where she created a place-based ecological education training for her fellow guides.  She earned her B.S. from the University of Vermont in Fisheries and Wildlife Management and spent the first 7 years of her career focusing on Salmon and Steelhead research before making the jump to education.

Sammy Matsaw

Shoshone-Bannock and Oglala Lakota
PhD Candidate: Water Resources

University of Idaho

 

As Shoshone-Bannock and Oglala Lakota, I was raised hunting, fishing, and gathering. My father’s ancestry is Agai Dika, which translates to “salmon eaters.” Today, my academic pursuit as a fish ecologist at the University of Idaho in Moscow is closely tied to that ancestry. I bring my cultural lineage together with my academic background to share the ideas that were taught in the communities where I grew up. My current field of study is the indigenous science and aquatic ecology of freshwater mussels, a “first food” of the Shoshone-Bannock.

Josh Edmundson

River Guide, Backcountry Horsepacking Guide

Hughes River Expeditions, Middle Fork Outfitters

 

As a 5th generation Idahoan with lifeblood running through the wilderness canyons of the state Josh brings years passionate work as a guide to the Idaho River Rendezvous. An expert whitewater boatman, sweepboat driver, packer, fisherman, sage. 

Roy Akins

Idaho Outfitter, Guide, Riggins City Council

Rapid River Outfitters, Tightlines

Roy Akin's is the owner of Rapid River Outfitters in Riggins, Idaho, where he is an experienced guide, fisherman, and mentor. Growing up in Southern Idaho and escaping to the river gorges of the Salmon, Roy has emerged as one of the beacons of conservation support and public involvement within the Idaho guiding community.

Dakota Goodman

Idaho Guide, Law Student

University of Idaho

Dakota works as a river guide and trip leader for O.A.R.S. and Dories in Idaho. As a river guide, she engages in educating customers about the river, the earth and human history of the canyon, and the Wild and Scenic status. Sitting in the seat of a wooden dory that was named in recognition of a lost watershed, made her realize how she had been sitting and walking in the steps of giants. Her work with Friends of the River allowed her to find a path. There was a turning point where the movement to protect landscape shifted to waterscape. Exploring Friends of the Rivers’ foundational presence within the modern river activism fight opened her perspective and understanding of why it is important to give rivers a voice. Dakota wants to see the day when those wooden boats names’ are part of history not the present.

Emily Ambrose

Grand Canyon Guide, Leadership Coach and Development

Engage Coaching & Consulting

Emily Ambrose (pronouns: she/her/hers), of Engage Coaching & Consulting, has dedicated her professional career to leadership development, training, facilitation, diversity, and inclusion work. Currently working at Colorado State University in Diversity, Training, and Development for over 10 years, she also found a home in the Grand Canyon working as a guide for Arizona Raft Adventures (AzRA). For the past three years, Emily has worked with companies and nonprofits to encourage culture change; conducted trainings on communication, leadership, and diversity; and served as a consultant to company leaders. As a first-time attendee and workshop presenter at this seminar, Emily is excited to be with others who are equally as passionate about the outdoors; she hopes to engage others in the sometimes-intimidating conversation around diversity and inclusion.